Jamie Windell

Good habits shape our confidence

January 28, 2020

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The quality of input that you put into your life all stems from the habits that we live out every day. So how do we take control and learn to be the creator of our inputs and architect of our environments?

Well, let's start with building habits that boost our self-confidence and quality of life.        

So what is a habit? According to Wikipedia.com,


“A habit is a routine or behavior that is repeated regularly and tends to occur unconsciously.”      


The below list is a few small examples of daily habits that can help boost our confidence. Why is it important to acknowledge the below and apply this in our lives? A lot successful individuals (Entrepreneurs, Athletes, Coaches, Musicians, etc) all share one common trait — they all develop good habits over time that are compounded.

Darryn Hardy states in his book — The Compound Effect


"A daily routine built on good habits is the difference that separates the most successful amongst us from everyone else".


The above examples work for some and might not entirely work for others, you have to explore, test and learn to see what works best for you.

Here is a short example of how a dear friend of mine and I used learning to shape our confidence;

You have heard the expression "knowledge is power" — and this is what I did. About 3 years ago, I went on a learning frenzy — I started reading more books in topics I was interested in (I'll be sharing my top ten books with you next week), listening to Podcasts that sparked my imagination and asking the people around me powerful questions to just soak in as much knowledge as I could.

Another fundamental shift was surrounding myself with like-minded individuals who shared similar values and who were on a path to learn and succeed. This wasn't easy to find but as you are building your confidence you have to learn to step out and talk to "strangers" whether this is at the gym, work, cafe or a local sporting ground.

Having these types of friends or circle of mini mentors to support you, bounce ideas off and pick you up when the tough gets going — is exactly what you need when building your confidence.

I was introduced to a young gentleman, named "Kaelan" at the gym just at the start of when I was on this learning frenzy journey. We started chatting at the gym "as guys do — starts off with just lifting weights to then chatting about life to fellow gymers" and after regular chats at the gym, we started to become really good friends with similar dreams and goals we embarked on a learning journey together — from exchanging books to attending networking events and expos — we were ultimately holding each other accountable to learn and grow every day. Our Friday evenings turned into watching inspiring Interviews On YouTube — thanks Gary Vee, Ed Mylett, Tom Bilyeu, and Omar Elattar!

Whatever idea we had we took action and made it happen, whether it became a success or it was a complete fail, we never saw it as a waste of time. Diving in deep and taking massive action is what we did no matter the outcome. The results — fast forward to today, Kaelan opened his very owned Wellness Hub and Fitness Centre which he still runs today, this was ignited by a single idea, a desire to learn and a relentless drive to make it happen. Allowing ourselves to be open to learning and making new connections unlocks the limitless opportunities we have.

So, to sum up the above — "Competence builds confidence" and how do we gain competence? By making continuous learning our daily habit which ultimately shapes and builds our confidence.

Keep learning, keep growing and keep going!

Jamie

P.S — feel free to connect with me or reach out should you need any help and support or simply subscribe below to stay inspired and connected.

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